We should talk – what are you doing to ensure student safety online?

winamp_coneIt is one of the most important conversations we can have. When student privacy and safety is at stake, we all have an obligation to do our part.

Keeping in mind that laws and policies vary depending on where you are and what age you work with, there are some common sense tips we should all follow.

The discussion below was inspired by comments left by educators on this Edublogger post over the past few weeks.

This post was co-written by Ronnie Burt and Sue Waters.

Is it fact, fiction, hype or fear?

Let us start by discussing the concerns of students working online and why we need to care before looking at some common sense tips.

As middle school teacher Jabiz Rasidana says:

“What, exactly is it, that everyone is so afraid of?”

Too often media creates hysteria about Internet predators leading school districts to respond to parent and teacher concerns by blocking any kind of social networking while failing to highlight the positive aspects achieved when students collaborate online as part of a global community.

Gail Desler highlights:

While we recognize that online predators pose a threat, about 1% of child abuse and sexual abuse cases, and we certainly do not dismiss the need to teach our students about safety issues, such as “grooming,” we also want all students to learn to use the Internet effectively and ethically.

Our middle school counselors, for instance, report that over 60% of their case load involves handling and defusing cyberbullying and “sexting” issues – mainly from smart phones. Pretty much 100% of the time, the parents are clueless as to how their children are using the Internet.

Digital citizenship should be built into media literacy —media literacy as a must-have skill for the 21st century.

Internet safety is best taught at school and not at home (sorry, parents).

And like Kathleen McGready says:

The biggest thing is … you can’t just do one off lessons on cyber safety. Cyber safety is not a separate subject.

Through being heavily involved in blogging, my grade two class has opportunities almost every day to discuss cyber safety issues and appropriate online behaviours in an authentic setting.

When we’re writing blog posts and comments together, a wide range of issues come up incidentally. The discussions are so rich and purposeful and my students now have an excellent understanding of the do’s and don’ts of internet safety.

Most of us agreed that:

  1. Teaching students what can and what shouldn’t be shared online can’t be boiled down to a few lessons.
  2. It is best if the topic is brought up often and in context when working with any web technology.

What do we need to consider?

The reality is that we’ve got to face the questions and concerns raised when students are online head on.

lightbulb

Our world is increasingly connected, and our students need to know how to interact online safely and with some level of privacy. The trouble is that educators, administrators, online web tools, politicians, and parents just aren’t sure what that looks like yet. And for some reason, a consensus decision isn’t likely anytime soon. Either way, we must educate students about the expectations we have of them when they are online and about the digital footprint they leave behind.

We need to educate our students on how to work in a safe online environment.

As Kathleen McGeady commented,

“I don’t think it matters that much what your actual policies are on photos/avatars/no images etc as long as you’re having conversations and doing something!”

Here’s some things to consider and our advice when working online with your students.

Tip #1:  Set clear guidelines

Set GuidelinesIt’s crucial to have clear guidelines so that all parents and students are aware of what is and isn’t appropriate.

The best approach is to get students involved with creating the guidelines.

For example. Pernille Ripp has an excellent activity using the analogy  The Internet is like a Mall.  She tells them that going on the internet is like going to the mall without your parents’ supervision and asks them to share how do they stay safe at the mall?  This takes the students from a topic they already understand and know to applying those same principles online.

Check out these examples:

  1. Pernille Ripp’ s Internet Safety Plan and Blogging Introduction
  2. Kathleen McGeady’s Introduction to Bloggigng HandoutGuide to Getting the Most out of 2KM’s Class blog and Our Blog Guidelines
  3. Edublogs Guide to Using Blogs With Students

Here’s how to set up your blogging rules and guidelines.

Tip #2:  Use of student names

What names to use?This is usually one of the first items to think about before using any online services with students.

Can they use their full name, first name only, last initial, or maybe a made-up username? In general, obtaining parent permission for minors is important when using anything other than a made-up or “code” name.

Most educators use the student’s first name only combined with a combination of letters and/or numbers that might represent their year level, room number, school or class blog such as amberh4 or adrianhan10 for student usernames and blog URLs.

Tip #3:  Use of  photos

Use of ImagesUse of student photos, and especially linking names with specific photos, are also questions that come up when blogging, sharing videos, or using other web services online. Even though 99.9% of visitors to your class blog will be well meaning parents, students, community members, or interested visitors from around the world, the unfortunate reality is that those with bad intentions can also visit public sites. There are also cases where the personal background of a student might mean they need more privacy and anonymity than others.

Decisions on whether to use student photographs or not is often more about protecting educators from having problems with parents or administrators who have concerns about cyber-predators.

A safe compromise is to only use photo taken from behind students.

On the other hand, one of the most engaging and powerful aspects of blogging comes from the sense of pride and ownership that only happens when you put yourself out there for the world to see. For this reason, many teachers do use student images.

As middle school teacher Jabiz Rasidana points out on Intrepid Teacher,

“the most rewarding experiences I have had online, the most authentic and personal relationships have been because I shared more than I should have.”

And the same is true for students. We put our thoughts and ideas out there, and everyone learns from it – especially the blogger.

Kathleen McGready says:

Unlike many classes, I identify students by first name and photo. Of course I gain parent permission for this and 100% of my parents have been supportive. Last year, I did not publish photos of students and I think there were more cons than pros. The parents and the classes we work with around the world are able to connect more with our blog and student work by seeing who the authors are.

Taking it a step further, any student comments or posts may need to be kept private behind a password. This is understandable – imagine if you were the one student in a class that for one reason or another shouldn’t have your photo online especially when it comes to your avatar.  All of your classmates have a photo avatar while you are left with a funny image or drawing. You probably wouldn’t be too happy about this.

An alternative solution is to get your students to create  their own avatar using these online reources without using a photo!

The key is to have the conversations with your administrators and parents about the use of photos online — so you can address the needs of your community.

Tip #4: Public vs Private

film

Many times, cautious administrators or teachers will opt to keep all blogs private.

However, being locked behind a password greatly limits the global learning aspect that encourages outsiders to visit and comment on student blogs.  Further still, it can really stifle the energy and motivation created when students know they are writing so that their family and friends (and even strangers) can see.

  • If students share a video they created in a class presentation they will probably get excited.
  • If students publish the same video on the web for all to see, they feel accomplished and professional!

From experience we’ve found that when educators allow their students to publish their content in a public space they spend more time educating their students and reinforcing appropriate online behavior than those that use private sites locked behind a password.

And don’t forget, on public blogs you can set up systems like Leigh Newton uses where all comments and posts spark an email to him, the administrator.

Here’s how you moderate all comments and posts on student blogs — if you need/want to take this approach.

Tip # 5: Student work and confidentiality

PrivateHowever, there are occasions when you really do need to consider confidentially.

There was one example we ran across recently where a teacher of special needs students had a class blog. By allowing students to comment on the blog, the students were identified as part of the special education program.  This lead to the important discussion about if this violates confidentiality for those students. In this case, the school administrators erred on the side of caution – and the wishes of the students and parents involved. The conclusion was to change the class blog to private so that only registered and approved visitors could visit it. The parents and students in the class were all given accounts to use.

Teacher feedback, specifically anything that can be interpreted as grades, is another area that educators that are blogging with students should be aware of. It is natural to leave comments on blogs for students, but there are other times when more detailed feedback may be best left for private.

Final Thoughts

As Common Sense Media puts it in one of their 10 beliefs,

“We believe in teaching our kids to be savvy, respectful and responsible media interpreters, creators, and communicators.  We can’t cover their eyes but we can teach them to see.”

agentHere’s some helpful resources

So what next?

Like the continuous discussions we should be having with our students, the dialog should continue among educators, parents, and policy makers to ensure we are maximizing learning freedoms while encouraging safe and smart web habits.

Please leave your thoughts or questions below for our blogging community to continue to learn from each other!

How to get the most out of online tools

It is practically impossible to keep up with the ever-changing tools and resources available to educators. Not to mention all of the new vocabulary and jargon that comes along with it.

web2041

The following posts from our own Sue Waters on TheEdublogger.com might be a great place to start:

Know of other great posts to help beginners out with ed tech or online tools? Share below so we can add them to the list!

Edublogs Weekly Review – Goblins, ghosts, and Halloween swag for your blog

smileAre you as excited about the chocolate and costume filled weekend ahead as we are?

We thought it might be fun to share a few of the Halloween resources we’ve come across which might make good additions to a weekend blog post or add a bit of holiday fun to your sidebar.

So here goes:

Online Pumpkin Carving

Use this web application from Spookathon.com to carve your own virtual pumpkin.  You can then download the carving as an image or embed the jack-o-lantern right inside of a post or page on your blog.

Halloween Widgets

PrimaryGames.com has kid friendly and fun widgets and resources such as puzzles and countdowns that can be put right on your blog.

Images and Avatars

One of our favorite free-use image sites, FindIcons.com, has many excellent images that would also make a great costume for your normal user or blog avatar as well!

Learning About Halloween

This post wouldn’t be complete without encouraging you to check out Larry Ferlazzo’s The Best Websites for Learning About Halloween list on his blog. This recently updated list is full of web resources on the history and cultural practices of both Halloween and The Day of the Dead.

Top #ebshare tweets from the week:

20 reasons why students should blog http://bit.ly/1HnfjW #edtechMon Oct 25 11:16:03 via TweetDeck


“A Timely Epiphany”…I’ve been reading and reflecting… http://is.gd/goyfo #sjsdblogs #stjosephschools #ebshareThu Oct 28 14:44:28 via Seesmic twhirl


Looking for ideas on how to help students evaluate web sites http://bit.ly/bLfa6Y #edchat #ebshareFri Oct 29 00:00:07 via web

Want to share a post, ask others to visit a blog for comments, or show off cool student work? Use the hashtag #ebshare to let us know so we can re-tweet it for you!

Featured Edublog of the Week

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Giles-Sweet Tech Blog

Chock-full of resources for students!

Ohio, USA

Find more great blogs like this one in our International Edublogs Directory.

Summing it up

If you know any additional Halloween resources to share, please leave a comment below.

Most importantly, everyone have a safe and happy Halloween!

Edublogs Weekly Review: Connect with classrooms and experts around the world with Skype

You may have heard that Skype announced this week the new ability to video conference with up to 10 users at once.

We’ve tested this out and find it to be really cool. And since many classrooms around the globe are using services like Skype, we thought we would share a bit more.

skype-logo-wide-fit

Skype is a free tool that allows users to make voice and video calls to any other Skype user in the world.

Teachers and students have been using Skype for years to bring experts, authors, and guest speakers right into the classroom with no travel necessary.  Previously, Skype didn’t allow more than two video callers at a time, and with this addition, even more connections and interactions can be shared simultaneously.

If you are looking for other classrooms to connect with, a great place to start is on this post from TheEdublogger.com.  To add your class to this list, visit this post here and leave your details.

Here are a few other great recent posts about using Skype in the classroom:

  1. An Author in Every Classroom: Kids connecting with authors via Skype. It’s the next best thing to being there.
  2. Learning Beyond Walls: 21 Skype Resources
  3. Skype Saves the Day for Teacher Seminar
  4. Miss Tyler-Smith’s Class: Our First Skype Call!!

Top edutweets from the week:


@bportlandslider
They have to have permission to get them out – but we’ve used cell phones in my 9th grade 6 out of the last 7 days.Mon Aug 30 14:45:48 via HootSuite

The 6 Step Plan to Using Your 21st Century Voice to Make a Difference http://j.mp/aUJt2FTue Aug 31 23:18:27 via Reeder

Just had an AWESOME Skype session w/ the students of @USCAnnenberg on #edreform and digital media | Thanks @BillCelisThu Sep 02 23:57:14 via TweetDeck



Featured Edublog of the Week

edu_featured_dir Heroes 2001
Indianapolis, Indiana USA
A fantastic English class blog!
Read our interview with Jana Haffley, creator of this blog here.

Find more great blogs like this one in our International Edublogs Directory!

Summing it up

As the world grows smaller each day, and increasing focus is placed on global connections and relationships, we think Skype and other communication tools (like blogs) will only increase in their popularity.

Leave a comment and let us know if you have used Skype in your teaching or if you have anything else to share!


Edublogs News: Featured blogs and a hero’s interview

For the past few months, we have announced on facebook and twitter our featured blog-o-the-week each Thursday.

We hope that others are able to gain ideas from these blogs while we are able to recognize teachers and students for all of their excellent work.

Featured blog of the week logo

This week, the featured blog is Heroes 2011 from Brebeuf Jesuit College Preparatory School in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Have a quick look at this blog, and you can tell that teacher Jana Haffley has worked hard with her Grade 11 English students on their blogs – complete with a Hero theme as much of the literature students read during the year is related to different heroes.

Jana was nice enough to answer a few questions from us so that we could share more about how she uses blogs in her classroom.

heroes

What do you teach?

I teach English 11. It’s derived from a primarily British Literature course, but it takes Joseph Campbell’s Hero Journey as its central theme and organizing principle. The literature selections are a blend of traditional texts from Great Britain and the world (Oedipus, Hamlet, Animal Farm, The Alchemist) and modern texts from various media (primarily film like The Matrix, V for Vendetta, Amazing Grace).

How long have you been blogging?

This is actually my third year. My pilot year was a mixed result. Last year was awesome, so I’m hopeful this year will be good, too.

What do you want to accomplish with using blogs with your students?

Wow, there’s several… Let’s start here: My first goal with the blogs was to join my students where they live: online. One of my colleagues introduced me to Edublogs, which looked pretty and cool. Then, as I tend to do, I dived in, researching social media and 21st Century education (you know, all the buzzwords), and I was hooked. I thought: This explains the growing disconnect between my otherwise fabulous course and the students. The realities of new media were becoming so pervasive I thought that if I didn’t jump on, I’d get left behind. So, one of my primary goals with blogging is to re-engage my students in their “schooling.” The kind of learning they do through their tech outside of school is so much more engaging than the 19th century model they are encountering in school, that the disconnect is obvious (and painful when one wants to inspire students). So, I want to convince them that what they learn in school can be as real and engaging and pertinent as the stuff they learn in their “real lives.”

Secondly, the ability to individualize instruction through the blogging model is enormously beneficial to me. I love that students who need extra time and the chance to review materials over and over again to gain mastery can have free access to the class outside the 50 minute window of class. And the visual learners can benefit from the multi-media model so that they don’t have to rely exclusively on the auditory channel through lectures and the like. PowerPoints become movies that they can review as needed online.

What are the benefits you have seen so far?

One of the most effective aspects of blogging is the “REAL AUDIENCE” of their peers that the forum provides. No longer are they attempting to please the teacher with writing drivel; they now write for a real audience, and suddenly they want to sound authentic and witty and smart. They even want their words to be more or less grammatically accurate so that they don’t look dumb to their peers. By writing beyond the audience of one, my students have a genuine motivation to improve their writing, and it is from that internal motivation that all authentic learning comes. So, blogging has made my job easier. They are writers and readers of each other in a medium they enjoy. What could be better?

What challenges have you faced with blogging in your classroom?

Assessment. The key issue I’ve found so far is how to give feedback effectively. I want to do it right on the blogs, but the public aspect of such feedback feels “wrong,” for lack of a better explanation. I don’t want to mortify students by revealing to all what kind of “grade” they got, but, at the same time, there’s no paper to mark to give them private feedback. I’m working on email feedback, but that’s not very streamline or efficient. Plus, we have an electronic gradebook system that is primarily numerical (not a lot of room for comments, etc.), so systematically, finding a way to give feedback efficiently would be my major, current challenge.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

I’m a fan of Edublogs. I’ve looked around at other systems, and yours is by far the most adaptable. I have a lot of room to play, and so do my students, and that makes all the difference.

Thank you Jana for sharing with us!

Please feel free to leave comments below – especially with any ideas on assessing student work on blogs.

Learn and share in our growing Twitter community

twitter-bird

In case you missed it, yesterday our own Sue Waters published A Twitteraholic’s Guide to tweets, hashtags, and all things Twitter. If you haven’t jumped into the whole Twitter experience yet, you might be surprised at how many educators are using Twitter to collaborate and learn from each other.

Each day, on Edublogs and beyond, thousands of excellent posts are published and new exciting student projects are begun. This is exactly why we have recently created the Twitter hashtag #ebshare.

What is #ebshare for?

Hashtags are used so that anyone can easily follow a topic that interests them. We regularly tweet thought-provoking posts, new tech tools that can be used in the classroom, or anything else we think the educational community might find interesting.

The best part about #ebshare is that you can use it to share anything you would like, too! This is great for asking others to visit a blog for comments or showing off cool student work.

While the Twitteraholics guide mentioned above goes into much greater detail on how to use Twitter and hashtags, all you have to do is put #ebshare somewhere in your post, and that is it!

See #ebshare in action

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What about Facebook?

We haven’t forgotten about our Facebook fans either! Feel free to use the Edublogs Facebook page to post anything you would like to share with others. We might even re-tweet it for you on Twitter. :)

We hope that you find this new tool a useful way to connect with educators from across the globe.  Don’t be shy, share something with the community today!

Provide some details for your blog
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